Avoid Inconsistencies That Can Scare Employers Away

One of the fastest ways to scare recruiters and hiring managers away is with inconsistencies. If you’re actively looking, your resume may be the first time a potential employer meets you. If your resume catches their interest, the next step will be to view your LinkedIn profile.

To avoid raising eyebrows, make sure they won’t find any surprises. Your LinkedIn profile and resume shouldn’t mirror each other word-for-word. But there shouldn’t be inconsistencies either.

Job Titles

Start by making sure the job titles on your resume and LinkedIn profile are the same. If you have an obscure or inaccurate job title, you may choose to include the actual job title and a more accurate title with it. For example, if your job title is Analyst II, but your position is more System Analyst, you use Analyst II (System Analyst).

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Easy Ways To Make A Better First Impression

You’ve heard the saying “you never get a second chance to make a first impression.” That’s particularly true during your job search

Certainly, having the right skills, experience, and, in some cases, education is essential. However, recruiters and employers may not notice if you don’t make a good first impression.

Good enough to make them want to learn more.

Recruiters and employers meet you different ways. It might be when they receive your resume. It might be when they view your profile on LinkedIn. Since you have no way of knowing, it’s important to cover all fronts.

Replacing your task-focused resume and bare-bones LinkedIn profile will certainly make you more marketable. (Think achievements-based, strategically written resume and robust, optimized LinkedIn profile.)

In the meantime, there are a few simple steps you can take to make a better first impression.

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Is Your LinkedIn Photo (Or Lack Of) Hurting Your Chances?

30767835_sIt’s always surprising to me how many people don’t have a photo on their LinkedIn profile. A lot of people just don’t get around to it. These are generally the folks with the “skeleton” LinkedIn profiles with very little information.

Some people don’t put a photo on their LinkedIn profile because they’re afraid of discrimination. While most of these concerns seem to be related to age discrimination, I’m sure others are afraid of being discriminated against for other reasons.

The thing is that when you don’t have a photo on your LinkedIn profile recruiters and hiring managers wonder why. If they don’t see a photo while doing a LinkedIn search many won’t bother to click on the profile.

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Does Your LinkedIn Profile Look Outdated?

As you probably know, LinkedIn has rolled out a new user interface. Some things are gone, like the Advice for Contacting section. This makes it a bit trickier to make it easy for people to contact you, if you’re conducting a confidential job search.

But, there are also new sections that make it easier for you to showcase your brand. For example, the opportunity to insert a background photo.

Unfortunately, just as with their LinkedIn headline, many users leave LinkedIn’s default background shot.

Why?

Inserting a personal background photo on your LinkedIn profile is as simple as putting a cover shot on your Facebook page. And it serves a similar purpose.

It gives readers a chance to immediately learn a bit about you.

Beyond that, leaving the default background shot makes you appear outdated and lacking technological savvy.

Here are a few ways to update your LinkedIn profile today,

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5 Musts Before Starting Your Job Search

Like most things, a key element of job search success is planning. Unfortunately, many job seekers just jump right in. They begin looking at job ads and internal opportunities.

Bad idea.

Most people wouldn’t just put their home on the market without some planning. They would consider different neighborhoods, maybe research realtors, and evaluate mortgage rates. They would appraise their home and find out what they should repair or replace to get top dollar.

Yet every day, people decide that today they’re going to start looking for a new job. Once they find a few exciting opportunities they dust off their old resume and realize it needs an overhaul.

They quickly find that jumping into a job search without planning doesn’t lead to success. Here are 5 things you need to do before you begin your job search.

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How To Save Your LinkedIn Data – Steps You Need To Take Today

In September 2016, LinkedIn announced a redesign of its desktop (non-app) user interface. The announcement noted, “This is the largest redesign since LinkedIn’s inception.” The design update is expected to bring the desktop experience closer to what users of the LinkedIn mobile app are used to seeing.

More important than how LinkedIn will look once the redesign is rolled out is what features will — or won’t — still be included.

In the past, when LinkedIn has refreshed its user interface, it has removed features. In anticipation that this may happen with the forthcoming redesign, you should consider backing up your LinkedIn profile right now, so you don’t lose any data.

I don’t have the new version yet, but I know several people who do. I’ve gone through this process, it takes 5-10 minutes at most.

There are two things to do:

The first is to save a PDF of your profile. This will save the content in your profile only (no photos or graphics).

Begin by clicking on the downward arrow next to the “View profile as” button. Choose Save to PDF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’ll be able to open the PDF and view your content.

Next, you’ll need to archive your LinkedIn data.

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3 LinkedIn Strategies You’re Probably Not Using

24039012_lWhile I occasionally meet someone actively looking for work who doesn’t have a LinkedIn profile, most job seekers are smarter than that. They’ve heard having a LinkedIn profile is important so they spend a few hours putting one together.

Some job seekers make an effort to complete their profile. Most put up a “skeleton” profile that doesn’t include much more than their name, title, employers, and job titles. That’s just not enough.

Putting up a LinkedIn profile with just the basics will not help your job search. Here are 3 LinkedIn strategies that will make your profile more engaging.

Strong Summary

While your resume needs to showcase your qualifications, your LinkedIn profile needs to do double duty. It needs to convey your value and give readers an idea of who you are as a person.

Your Summary is an opportunity to tell your career story in a more personal way. Perhaps, you will want to share the impetus behind what you do or your management philosophy.

Unlike your resume, your LinkedIn profile should be written in the first person. Some resume writers make an effort to infuse your LinkedIn profile with your own words to provide authenticity.  This can be particularly effective in your Summary. (Here are some tips for your Headline)

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Worst LinkedIn Headline For Job Seekers

24914326_sYour LinkedIn Professional Headline is very valuable real estate. It’s the first line people see when they view your profile.  It’s also the first line people see when they do a LinkedIn search. (That includes recruiters who are trying to fill open positions.)

So it’s in your best interest to make it count.

Unfortunately, most people don’t use LinkedIn’s Professional Headline to their best advantage.

By Default

If left alone your LinkedIn headline will default to the title of your current position. This may or may not work to your advantage. If you’re a marketing manager who wants to remain a marketing manager allowing your LinkedIn profile to default to your current position probably won’t hurt you.

Providing you have a robust, optimized profile recruiters trying to fill a marketing manager position may find you. Still, leaving your headline in default mode won’t do much to help you either.

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