Now Is A Great Time For You To Find A New Job

If you’re looking for a new job, there’s some good news on the horizon. Most employers plan to take on new staff before the end of 2018.

Now through December 63% of employers, up from 60% last year, plan to hire full-time permanent employees according to CareerBuilder’s Midyear Job Forecast.

Even better, a substantial number of surveyed employers say they expect to offer higher salaries and perks including signing bonuses, extra PTO, free lunches, and remote work options to attract and retain talent.

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How To Choose Between Multiple Job Offers

8671265_sCongratulations! You got the job. In fact you were lucky enough to get multiple job offers. What should you do now? Which job offer should you accept?

Sometimes you’ll have a lot of time to decide, sometimes not.

Whatever the circumstances, it will be easier to make that decision if you have some sort of decision-making process in place.

Here are 3 options you can try if you receive more than one job offer.

Pros and Cons

This is a long standing method that needs very little explanation. You make two columns listing the Pros on one side and the Cons on the other. If you’re deciding between two jobs you’ll have to do an assessment of each and then evaluate which one is more appealing.

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You Can’t Dodge The Salary Question (Here’s How To Answer)

Most job seekers dread being asked about their salary. Some are uncomfortable revealing personal information. Many are concerned that sharing their current salary will influence potential job offers.

The truth is, you can’t dodge the salary question.***

But, to some degree you can control it. You do this by understanding the process and being prepared.

Why do recruiters ask about your salary?

As a former recruiter, I know they don’t ask your salary requirements to put you on the spot. They ask because they need to know if you are in the salary range for the position they are filling.  Remember, recruiters don’t work for you, they work for the employer.

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How To Make Sure Recruiters Can Find You On LinkedIn

Good recruiters don’t just place employment ads and wait. They go out and find candidates.

Why?

First, recruiters know that most of the people who respond to ads are not remotely qualified. They don’t want to waste their time.

Second, recruiters know that passive candidates and those casually looking are not regularly reading job ads. Yes, they might be open to a great opportunity, but they’re not actively looking.

Third, recruiters know that the chances are slim that someone who works for their employer’s competitor will respond to an ad. These people need to be found and enticed.

While there are many ways to find candidates, most recruiters turn to LinkedIn. Many spend hours setting up LinkedIn searches and combing through the results.

I certainly did when I was a recruiter.

Even if you’re not actively looking, you need to have a LinkedIn profile that will help recruiters find you.

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Do You Want To Know What Hiring Managers Think?

Looking for a job isn’t easy. Getting an interview is tough. Securing an offer is even tougher.

If the whole process was easy, unhappy workers wouldn’t hesitate to make a change. People wouldn’t be as devastated when they lost a job.

Of course, one of the most difficult thing for jobseekers is trying to figure out what hiring managers think. What are they looking for? What questions will they be asked during an interview? Is talking badly about a boss or former boss really that bad?

The list of questions goes on.

Well, today, we’re going to provide some insights gleaned from a survey of hiring managers conducted by Simply Hired**.

What You Can Expect

While a robust, optimized LinkedIn profile is essential to being found on LinkedIn, most (71%) of hiring managers don’t check candidate’s profiles. Of course, that means almost 30% do.

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Does Your Executive Resume Generate Calls?

Early in your career a resume that proves you have experience may be enough to get you the job. Once you’ve reached the executive level, it’s not.

Once you’re at the executive level, or are targeting those roles, you need to demonstrate value.

The value you bring to a potential employer.

At this level, recruiters and employers won’t be impressed that you managed a team, even a large team. That’s expected.

Recruiters and hiring managers want to see the positive impact you’ve had on your current and previous employers. The impact you’ve had on your team, on your department, or across the company.

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4 Ways To Heat Up Your Job Search This Summer

casual skirtsAfter a tough winter, summer is finally here. Vacationers back up traffic for miles and sometimes there’s even a line at the beach. Time to sit back, enjoy the warm weather, and chill.

Not so fast.

Tempting as it may be, if you’re looking for a new job, this is not the time to slack off.

Even a decade ago, most people thought summer was not a good time to look for a job. In some respects, they were right. But, things are much different today. While recruiters and hiring managers may be taking long weekends, even week-long vacations, in our 24/7 world of work no one is ever really out of the office.

That means it’s not the time to kick back and wait for September. Here are four ways to keep your job search moving this summer.

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Don’t Rely On Job Boards To Find A Job

Job boards are not the holy grail. Yes, applying online should be part of your job search strategy. The key word of the sentence being “part.”

One of the biggest mistakes job seekers make is relying on online job postings to find a job.

It’s easy to fall into the trap of sitting at the computer responding to job postings. For one thing, it doesn’t take a lot of effort. You can do it at home wearing sweat pants and a t-shirt while watching TV.

At the end of the day, knowing you’ve applied to 30 jobs, gives you a sense of accomplishment.

The truth is, focusing on job boards isn’t the best use of your time.

It’s more effective to take a multipronged approach.

Target Employers

At the beginning of your job search make a list of 10 companies you’d like to work for. These are your Target Employers. Contact  people in your network to see who can connect you with someone who works there. If the employee you connect with can get your resume in front of the hiring manager for your target position even better.

Set up Google alerts for each employer, that way you’ll be notified whenever they are in the news. Review the career section or job postings on their corporate websites, at least once a week.

As a former recruiter, I can say that every job I was trying to fill was listed on the company’s site. The only exceptions were “confidential” searches, generally when someone didn’t know they were being replaced.

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