6 Point Executive Resume Checklist

You may have heard of Marshall Goldsmith’s bestselling book What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful.

The truth is, it’s the same with resumes. The resume that generated interviews early in your career, won’t get you noticed once you reach the executive level.

The resume that listed your duties and responsibilities won’t impress recruiters and employers who are filling executive roles. Here is a 6 Point Checklist for developing an interview-generating, executive resume.

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Avoid Inconsistencies That Can Scare Employers Away

One of the fastest ways to scare recruiters and hiring managers away is with inconsistencies. If you’re actively looking, your resume may be the first time a potential employer meets you. If your resume catches their interest, the next step will be to view your LinkedIn profile.

To avoid raising eyebrows, make sure they won’t find any surprises. Your LinkedIn profile and resume shouldn’t mirror each other word-for-word. But there shouldn’t be inconsistencies either.

Job Titles

Start by making sure the job titles on your resume and LinkedIn profile are the same. If you have an obscure or inaccurate job title, you may choose to include the actual job title and a more accurate title with it. For example, if your job title is Analyst II, but your position is more System Analyst, you use Analyst II (System Analyst).

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Resume Bloopers: Bad To Bizarre

During your career your resume is one of your most important marketing tools. It’s  often the first time recruiters and hiring managers meet you. While some may overlook a typo or two there are some mistakes that you cannot recover from.

A recent article on “Interview Bloopers” was so popular I decided to follow it up with one on resumes.  With this in mind, I asked recruiters and hiring managers to send me some “Resume Bloopers” things that made them stop and say “I can’t believe that he or she put that on a resume!”

These are listed in what I consider bad to worse to bizarre.

Too Much Information

I’m in the construction industry. I’m always surprised to receive a resume with a headshot. To add to the blooper, an individual will often include: Divorced – 2 Adult Children – 1 Dog – Healthy Non-Smoker! This type of resume makes a recruiter cringe. It makes the company even more vulnerable to discrimination claims.

—Submitted by Revee While, Director of Marketing, Primaris

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How To Write A Compelling Thank You Note

If I had more time I would have written a shorter letter.

While this quote has been attributed to many, including Mark Twain and Winston Churchill, research tells us it was said by none.

Still, as any writer will tell you, it’s true.

It takes a lot longer to write a brief, compelling note than a lengthy, letter. That’s why composing a Thank You note is so tough.

Smart candidates email a thank you note within 24-hours.

A brief note. One that doesn’t require the reader to scroll. And scroll. And scroll.

Ideally, an e-thank you note, and e-cover letter, should run about 99 to 120 words. Which means you need to thank the interviewer and sell yourself quickly.

Beyond the requisite thank you, here are a few ideas of what you can include in a thank you note.

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Easy Ways To Make A Better First Impression

You’ve heard the saying “you never get a second chance to make a first impression.” That’s particularly true during your job search

Certainly, having the right skills, experience, and, in some cases, education is essential. However, recruiters and employers may not notice if you don’t make a good first impression.

Good enough to make them want to learn more.

Recruiters and employers meet you different ways. It might be when they receive your resume. It might be when they view your profile on LinkedIn. Since you have no way of knowing, it’s important to cover all fronts.

Replacing your task-focused resume and bare-bones LinkedIn profile will certainly make you more marketable. (Think achievements-based, strategically written resume and robust, optimized LinkedIn profile.)

In the meantime, there are a few simple steps you can take to make a better first impression.

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Employment History vs. Modern Resume

If you want to get an employer’s attention, don’t send them an employment history. Send them a results-driven, easy-to-scan resume.

While many people think they are one and the same.

They’re not.

The reaction they get from employers isn’t the same either.

Here are a few reasons why.

Old-School Resume (Employment History)

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2018 Job Search Prep

Hello 2018.

January is often the time when passive looking, turns into full on job searching. Holiday vacations are over. Bonuses have been divided between Christmas shopping and savings accounts.

If your goal is to find a new job this year, it’s time to get moving.

You can begin by starting on this list today.

Get Your Materials Together

First, make sure you resume is recruiter and hiring manager ready. Your resume is your calling card so make sure that it is a marketing document, which shows the impact you’ve had on your current and previous employers.

A boring employment history is not going to impress anyone. Employers want to know how you can solve their problems, you resume should clearly demonstrate your value in modern, easy-to-scan format.

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Don’t Rely On Job Boards To Find A Job

Job boards are not the holy grail. Yes, applying online should be part of your job search strategy. The key word of the sentence being “part.”

One of the biggest mistakes job seekers make is relying on online job postings to find a job.

Big mistake.

It’s easy to fall into the trap of sitting at the computer responding to job postings. For one thing, it doesn’t take a lot of effort. You can do it at home wearing sweat pants and a t-shirt while watching TV.

At the end of the day, knowing you’ve applied to 20 jobs, gives you a sense of accomplishment.

The truth is, focusing on job boards isn’t the best use of your time.

It’s more effective to have a multi pronged approach.

Target Employers

At the start of your job search make a list of 10 employers you’d like to work for. These are your Target Employers. Contact your network to see who might have a connection for you. Set up Google alerts for each of them. Review job postings on their websites, at least once a week.

As a former recruiter, I can say that every job I was working was listed on the companies site. The only exceptions were “confidential” postings, i.e. when someone was being replaced without their knowledge.

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