3 Reasons Recruiters Aren’t Calling You

As a businessperson, I go to a lot of networking events. Some, like SHRM, provide professional development. Often, I’m speaking at job seeker groups. Wherever the event, I always meet people who are looking for a new job.

Their most common complaint is not getting interviews.

Before becoming a resume writer, I worked as a recruiter. That means I reviewed countless resumes and spent hours on LinkedIn looking for candidates. That experience gives me some insight into why recruiters call some candidates but not others. Here are 3 reasons.

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10 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Accepting A Job Offer

Evaluating a new opportunity isn’t easy. Even your dream job will have less exciting aspects. Things that are downright boring. I speak from experience.

I was what is known as a nontraditional student. That means I worked a full-time job and took my classes in the evening.

As a twenty-something, I did my best to find time for a social life too. The occasional date or evening out with friends. It took me almost 7 years to get my B.A.

After graduating with a degree in English and a minor in Media Studies, I landed a job as an assistant editor with a national 4-color magazine. Within the first 30-days I was writing the news column. Since it was a small publication, in a few months I was writing feature articles and helping the photographer with cover shoots. And I had the best boss ever.

It was awesome.

I loved every minute of it.

Almost.

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6 Common LinkedIn Profile Mistakes And How To Easily Fix Them

5 Common LinkedIn Profile Mistakes And How To Easily Fix ThemToday, the majority of recruiters use LinkedIn to source candidates for open positions. That means, every day countless numbers of recruiters are searching LinkedIn profiles. Many of them may be looking for someone just like you.

Unfortunately, most people set up their LinkedIn profile and promptly forget about it. They plan to go back and write the Summary or at least post some descriptions under the job titles. But, they never do.

Without a doubt, one of the most productive things you can do to move your job-search forward it to have robust LinkedIn profile. However, making a few easy updates will help you be found.

#1 Headline

Your LinkedIn headline is valuable real estate. Don’t settle for the default which is your current job title. Don’t waste it with phrases like “Looking for new opportunities.” Use it for something that recruiters will actually search for like your key skills or a branding statement.

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Do You Have A “Tombstone” Resume?

The best resumes, the ones that will get a hiring manager’s attention, are marketing documents. They are designed to sell you (the product) to a potential employer (the buyer).

They are not laundry lists of responsibilities. They are not boring employment histories. They don’t include every job you’ve ever had or every single thing you’ve done during your career.

That style of resume is sometimes called a “Tombstone” resume because it is directed towards the past, not the future.

Your future.

When you’re putting together your resume keep these 5 things in mind.

1) Your resume is a marketing tool. It’s not an employment history or a job application. While you should never lie or grossly exaggerate, you should frame the content in a way that sells you to a potential employer. Here’s why lies matter.

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How To Avoid Being Considered The Lazy Candidate

How much do you know about a company before you apply for a job?

When I was recruiting, I always asked potential candidates if they were familiar with the company during my screening call.

The smart ones said, yes and went on to tell me what they knew.

The lazy ones said no.

Not a good sign.

When you’re competing for a job, one of the things many employers will ask is “why do you want to work here?”

If you don’t know anything about the company what can you say?

One of the keys to being successful during job interviews is to research companies in advance and prepare a few responses to questions like “what do you know about us?” and “how did you find this job?” and, the inevitable, “why do you want to work here?”

Imagine you’re interviewing with Amazon.

Since the company is a household name and you’ve probably shopped with them often, you might think you know a lot about the company. You might not bother to do your research.

Here’s why that would be a mistake on your part.

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Make It Easy For Recruiters To Say Yes To You

Most recruiters and hiring managers are sourcing candidates on social media, particularly LinkedIn.  Which is great news if you have a robust, optimized LinkedIn profile.

As a recruiter I spent hours on LinkedIn sourcing candidates, often scrolling through 500+ possible matches. Some were easily eliminated due to a missing or inappropriate photo. My all-time favorite being the woman wearing a wedding gown, veil and all.

Potential candidates fell into 2 categories:1) Yes, contact them immediately and 2) they might be a possibility. The one thing that consistently moved candidates from maybe to yes was if it was easy to contact them.

The point is, don’t make the mistake thinking if recruiters want to contact you they will track you down or use an InMail. Unless they think you are a perfect candidate, they may not. You can increase your odds by making it easy for them by including contact information on your LinkedIn profile.

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What Recruiters Can (And Cannot) Do For You

Many job seekers are under the misconception that recruiters are there to help them find a job. They aren’t. Whether they’re contingency, consultants or retained search, recruiters work for employers.

That doesn’t mean that they can’t help you find a new job.

It depends on what your goal is.

Based on my experience as a recruiter, recruiters are eager to help you when you’re easy to place.

A recruiter’s goal is to fill one or more open positions. If they are working contingency, they only get paid when a client hires one of their candidates. They may have to wait until the candidate is there 30-days to get paid.

While corporate recruiters are not on commission, they may be paid a bonus based on how many positions they fill. They will certainly be judged on the quality of candidates they present.

As I tell my clients, recruiters are looking for a round peg that will fit into the round hole they are trying to fill. If you’re a square peg they’re unlikely to spend much time with you.

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Avoid Inconsistencies That Can Scare Employers Away

One of the fastest ways to scare recruiters and hiring managers away is with inconsistencies. If you’re actively looking, your resume may be the first time a potential employer meets you. If your resume catches their interest, the next step will be to view your LinkedIn profile.

To avoid raising eyebrows, make sure they won’t find any surprises. Your LinkedIn profile and resume shouldn’t mirror each other word-for-word. But there shouldn’t be inconsistencies either.

Job Titles

Start by making sure the job titles on your resume and LinkedIn profile are the same. If you have an obscure or inaccurate job title, you may choose to include the actual job title and a more accurate title with it. For example, if your job title is Analyst II, but your position is more System Analyst, you use Analyst II (System Analyst).

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